NATION’S REPORT CARD: HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TEST SCORES IN READING AND MATH SHOW NO IMPROVEMENT IN 40 YEARS

  • Average reading scores have only increased by 2 points from 1971 to 2012
  • Math scores have also remained stagnant, increasing only 2 points from 1973 to 2012 for 17-year-olds
  • 9 and 13-year-olds have shown more improvement in both areas
  • Officials attribute poor performance in 17-year-olds to lower drop-out rates
  • By Associated Press Reporter

Despite technological advances and economic improvement in the last few decades, high school seniors are faring no better in reading or math than their peers decades ago.

Officials attributed the bleak finding on more lower-performing students staying in school rather than dropping out.

The news was brighter for younger students and for blacks and Hispanics, who had the greatest gain in reading and math scores since the 1970s, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, commonly referred to as the ‘Nation’s Report Card’.

 
Stagnant: Average reading test scores for 17-year-olds has only increased 2 points from 1971 t0 2012, though 9 and 13-year-olds have seen more improvement

Stagnant: Average reading test scores for 17-year-olds has only increased 2 points from 1971 t0 2012, though 9 and 13-year-olds have seen more improvement

 ‘In some ways, the findings are full of hope. Today’s children ages 9 and 13 are scoring better overall than students at those ages in the early ’70s,’ said Brent Houston, principal of the Shawnee Middle School in Oklahoma and a member of the National Assessment Governing Board, which administers the tests.

But he also noted challenges for older students.

 ‘There is a disturbing lack of improvement among 17-year-olds. Since the early 1970s, the average scores of 17-year-olds in both reading and mathematics have remained stagnant,’ he said.

The report says that in reading, today’s 9- and 13-year-olds are outperforming students tested in 1971, when that skill was first tracked. They also did better in math, compared with students in 1973, the initial measurement.

 
Straight line: Average math scores have also remained steady for 17-year-olds, increasing only 2 points from 1973 to 2012

Straight line: Average math scores have also remained steady for 17-year-olds, increasing only 2 points from 1973 to 2012

 Officials suggest the results for 17-year-old students reflect fewer low-performing students dropping out.

For instance, Hispanic students had a 32 percent dropout rate in 1990 and that number fell to 15 percent in 2010, said Peggy Carr, an associate commissioner with the National Center for Education Statistics.

‘These students are generally scoring at the lower end of the distribution but it’s a good thing that they’re staying in schools,’ Carr said.

Even so, they’re still not learning more despite increased education spending.

‘Today’s results are the nation’s education electrocardiogram and show positive results for the early grades and increased performance by students of color, but the nation’s high school students are in desperate need of serious attention,’ said Bob Wise, president of the Alliance for Excellent Education and former governor of West Virginia.

‘Today’s economic trends show the rapidly growing need for college- and career-ready students. These results show that most of the nation’s 17-year-olds are career ready, but only if you’re talking about jobs from the 1970s,’ he added.

 
Study: Officials believe the lack of improvement for 17-year-olds can be attributed to lower-performing students staying in school more often than dropping out

Study: Officials believe the lack of improvement for 17-year-olds can be attributed to lower-performing students staying in school more often than dropping out

Black and Hispanic students at all ages narrowed the performance gap with white students, according to the report.

Among 17-year-old students, the gaps between black and white students and between Hispanic and white students were cut by half.

In math, 9-year-old black and Hispanic students today are performing at a level where black and Hispanic 13-year-olds were in the early 1970s.

‘Black and Hispanic children have racked up some of the biggest gains of all,’ said Kati Haycock, president of the Education Trust, an advocacy organization. ‘These results very clearly put to rest any notion our schools are getting worse. In fact, our schools are getting better for every group of students that they serve.’

The overall composition of classrooms is changing as well.

Among 13-year-old students, 80 percent were white in 1978. By 2012, that number fell to 56 percent. The number of Hispanics roughly tripled from 6 percent in 1978 to 21 percent in 2012.

‘Over a 40-year period, an awful lot changes in our education system,’ said Jack Buckley, the chief of the National Center for Education Statistics.

 
Improvement: While 17-year-olds as a group did not show improvement, blacks and Hispanics students had the greatest gain in reading and math scores since the 1970s

Improvement: While 17-year-olds as a group did not show improvement, blacks and Hispanics students had the greatest gain in reading and math scores since the 1970s

 While most groups of students saw their scores climb since 1971, the same cannot be said when comparing 2008 results with 2012. The 9-year-old and 17-year-old students saw no changes and only Hispanic and female 13-year-olds showed improvement in reading and math.

The 2012 results were based on 26,000 students in public and private schools. The tests took roughly one hour and were not significantly different than when they were first administered in the early 1970s.

Unlike high-stakes tests that are included in some teachers’ evaluations, these tests are a more accurate measurement because ‘these are not exams that teachers are not teaching to’,Haycock said.

‘Nobody teaches to the NAEP exam, which is why it’s such as useful measure to what our kids can actually do,’ she said.

 
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3 thoughts on “NATION’S REPORT CARD: HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TEST SCORES IN READING AND MATH SHOW NO IMPROVEMENT IN 40 YEARS

  1. National math test scores continue to be disappointing. This poor trend persists in spite of new texts, standardized tests with attached implied threats, or laptops in the class. At some point, maybe we should admit that math, as it is taught currently and in the recent past, seems irrelevant to a large percentage of grade school kids.

    Why blame a sixth grade student or teacher trapped by meaningless lessons? Teachers are frustrated. Students check out.

    The missing element is reality. Instead of insisting that students learn another sixteen formulae, we need to involve them in tangible life projects. And the task must be interesting.

    Project-oriented math engages kids. It is fun. They have a reason to learn the math they may have ignored in the standard lecture format of a class room.

    Alan Cook
    info@thenumberyard.com
    http://www.thenumberyard.com
    http://mathconstructioneducationindustry.blogspot.com

    • When Singapore’s first Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew looked around for country with the best education standard in the world to follow, he did not choose U.S. but went to Japan and asked what’s their system. They told him math and more math and more math, plus science as the second priority of course. Asian schools and India are not afraid to educate their kids the hard way. America in the meantime has become obsessed with fixing emotionally messed up kids they think playing nanny and counselor will fix their ‘low self-esteem’ issue, which they believe is the biggest problem facing school children today. And making school hard for these emotionally struggling kids would destroy them so the solution is to let them be dumb but keep on telling them they are ‘special’.

      The U.S. public school system today is all about touchy-feely indoctrination of liberal agenda while abandoning the basics of education. How embarrassing, very embarrassing, for a nation to allow students to graduate high school students without learning how to read. The bigotry of low expectation, the lack of high standard and the culture of ‘get-rich-by-being-infamous’ created a new breed of American students who believe it’s okay to have a sub-standard education because not only it’s easy they also believe it’s perfectly okay. Kids are not only being spoiled when they get home to busy parents but they are also being spoiled when they go to school by teachers who want it easy for both the teachers and the students.

      Society, family, government, school and the kids all contribute to the failing demise of the American students today. And once society has become lazy, there’s no turning back that’s why you cannot give a lazy bum homeless guy on the street a job because in the first place he does not want it. He’s used to being a lazy bum. Work is something strange to him. Kids who are used to doing it the easy way will grow up and won’t have the work ethics to transfer to the next generation. America today wants it easy and fun. Hard work is not fun anymore.

  2. Pingback: New NAEP Scores Extend Dismal Trend in U.S. Education Productivity | United States of WHOLE America

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